+27 (0) 44 870 8585 info@MinnesotaHouse.org

Self-Assessment

Co-Dependency, Drug Addiction And Alcoholism Self-Assessments

 

Chemical Dependency and Drug Addiction Assessment

The process commences by calling the Minnesota House 24-hour emergency line 082 696 9669 or our landline 044 870 8585. Then you will communicate with a professional person who is knowledgeable about addiction and equipped to perform a brief telephonic assessment of the next step going forward. This may involve immediate admittance and or setting up an in person assessment by a member of our therapeutic team.
Should the person need and/or be agreeable to be admitted immediately, the practical aspects of this process can be expedited with our highly efficient administrative support staff. An assessment process be will be carried out to identify the new patient’s treatment needs, based on the his or her emotional, physical and psychiatric history.
The financial considerations and the relevant medical aid cover will all be addressed organised by our highly efficient administrative support staff.
Should the individual be suitable for treatment at any of the treatment options at Minnesota House arrangements will be made. If an alternate treatment facility is preferable, we will assist with referrals.

Landline: 044 870 8585

24-hour emergency: 082 696 9669

 

Self-Assessments

Codependency Self-Assessment Test

People who live with, or care for, a person who has an addiction or psychological disorder can develop their own psychological problems. They can become addicted to caring for others. Such behaviour can be harmful to the carer and it can also reinforce the addictive behaviour of their loved one. Treatment is possible, but the first step is to identify whether you display any signs of codependency.

The following questions are designed to be used merely as guidelines for identifying possible signs of codependency. They are not intended to provide a sure-fire method of diagnosis, nor can negative answers to these questions provide absolute assurance that you are not co-dependent.

Symptomatic Denial

Denial is common and symptomatic of co-dependency, so you may deny that you have a problem both to yourself and to others, through:

  • Minimising the impact of your co-dependency on your health.
  • Criticising those around you for making too much fuss about your relationships.
  • Concealing your co-dependent behaviours and relationships from your friends or family.
  • Placing the blame for your co-dependency on other people or situations in your life, such as “I devote myself to my friends and family but when I need help, no one is there for me”, or “I do my best for people and I never get any thanks for it”.

 

Answer yes or no to each question

    1. Do you keep quiet in order to avoid arguments?

Are you always worried about what other people think of you?

  1. Have you ever lived with someone who has an alcohol/drug/other addiction problem or a psychological disorder?
  2. Have you ever lived with someone who hits or belittles you?
  3. Are the opinions of others more important than your own?
  4. Do you have difficulty adjusting to changes at work or at home?
  5. Do you feel rejected when your significant others spend time with friends?
  6. Do you doubt your ability to be who you want to be?
  7. Are you uncomfortable expressing your true feelings to others?
  8. Have you ever felt inadequate?
  9. Do you feel like a bad person when you make a mistake?
  10. Do you have difficulty accepting compliments or gifts?
  11. Do you feel humiliated when your child or spouse makes a mistake?
  12. Do you think that people in your life would go downhill without your constant efforts?
  13. Do you frequently wish that someone would help you to get things done?
  14. Do you have difficulty talking to people in authority, such as the police or your boss?
  15. Are you confused about who you are or where you are going with your life?

Determining if you may be Co-dependent
If you’re wondering if you’re co-dependent, take a look at the following list of common symptoms. You don’t have to have all of them to be co-dependent, and there are degrees of severity of co-dependency. If untreated, codependency gets worse over time, but with help you can recover and be much more effective in your work and relationships. Here are some common traits:

  1. Low self-esteem
  2. Not liking or accepting yourself
  3. Feeling you’re inadequate in some way
  4. Thinking you’re not quite enough
  5. Worrying you are or could be a failure
  6. Concerned with what other people think about you
  7. Perfectionism
  8. Pleasing others and giving up yourself
  9. Poor boundaries that are weak, too rigid or flip back and forth.
  10. Reactivity
  11. Dysfunctional Communication
  12. Difficulty expressing thoughts and feelings
  13. Difficulty setting boundaries — saying “No” or stopping abuse

Co-dependents Checklist: codas are known to display the following character traits:

  1. minimise, alter, or deny how they truly feel.
  2. have difficulty identifying what they are feeling.
  3. perceive themselves as completely unselfish and dedicated to the well-being of others.
  4. lack empathy for the feelings and needs of others
  5. label others with their negative traits.
  6. think they can take care of themselves without any help from others.
  7. mask pain in various ways such as anger, humour, or isolation.
  8. express negativity or aggression in indirect and passive ways.
  9. do not recognise the unavailability of those people to whom they are attracted.
  10. have difficulty making decisions.
  11. judge what they think, say, or do harshly, as never good enough.
  12. are embarrassed to receive recognition, praise, or gifts.
  13. others’ approval of their thinking, feelings, and behaviour over their own.
  14. do not perceive themselves as lovable or worthwhile persons.
  15. seek recognition and praise to overcome feeling less than.
  16. have difficulty admitting a mistake.
  17. to appear to be right in the eyes of others and may even lie to look good.
  18. are unable to identify or ask for what they need and want.
  19. perceive themselves as superior to others.
  20. look to others to provide their sense of safety.
  21. have difficulty getting started, meeting deadlines, and completing projects.
  22. have trouble setting healthy priorities and boundaries.

Compliance Patterns of Codependency

  1. are extremely loyal, remaining in harmful situations too long.
  2. compromise their own values and integrity to avoid rejection or anger.
  3. put aside their own interests in order to do what others want.
  4. are hyper vigilant regarding the feelings of others and take on those feelings.
  5. are afraid to express their beliefs, opinions, and feelings when they differ from those of others.
  6. accept sexual attention when they want love.
  7. make decisions without regard to the consequences.
  8. give up their truth to gain the approval of others or to avoid change.

 

Scoring the codependency self-assessment test

If you answered “Yes” to 5 or more of these questions, you may have a problem. This condition is treatable and you should contact us, your doctor or another qualified professional for a full assessment and/or go to a meeting of CODA, AA, NA, GA, OA or another pertinent support group.

Codependency Hurts

Are you co-dependent but think you are only helping?

Codependency describes behaviours, thoughts and feelings that go beyond normal kinds of self-sacrifice or care-taking. For example, parenting is a role that requires a certain amount of self-sacrifice and giving a child’s needs a high priority and yet a parent could still be co-dependent in an unhealthy way. Parents who takes care of their own needs (emotional and physical) in a healthy way are better caretakers, whereas a co-dependent parent may be less effective and may even do harm to a child. Another way to look at this is that the needs of an infant are necessary but temporary, whereas the needs of the co-dependent are constant.

People who are co-dependent often take on the role of mother hen; they constantly put others’ needs before their own and in doing so forget to take care of themselves. This creates a sense that they are needed; they cannot stand the thought of being alone with no one needing them. Co-dependent people are constantly in search of acceptance. When it comes to arguments, co-dependent people also tend to set themselves up as the victim. When they do stand up for themselves, they feel guilty.

The following are some of the patterns and characteristics of co-dependent people and are offered as a tool to aid in self-evaluation. They may be particularly helpful to newcomers in recovery too.

Denial Patterns

I have difficulty identifying what I am feeling. I minimize, alter, or deny how I truly feel. I perceive myself as completely unselfish and dedicated to the well-being
of others. I lack empathy for the feelings and needs of others. I label others with my negative traits. I can take care of myself without any help from others. I mask my pain in various ways such as anger, humor, or isolation. I express negativity or aggression in indirect and passive ways. I do not recognize the unavailability of those people to whom I am attracted.

Low Self Esteem Patterns

I have difficulty making decisions. I judge what I think, say, or do harshly, as never good enough. I am embarrassed to receive recognition, praise, or gifts. I value others’ approval of my thinking, feelings, and behaviour over my own. I do not perceive myself as a lovable or worthwhile person. I constantly seek recognition that I think I deserve. I have difficulty admitting that I made a mistake.

I need to appear to be right in the eyes of others and will even lie to look good. I am unable to ask others to meet my needs or desires. I perceive myself as superior to others. I look to others to provide my sense of safety. I have difficulty getting started, meeting deadlines, and completing projects. I have trouble setting healthy priorities.

 

Get Help

As a leading, private behavioural health clinic for the treatment of co-dependence, Minnesota House is able to help you. We can answer any questions or concerns you may have, and help you find the right treatment.

I Think I Need Co-Dependency Treatment, How Can Minnesota House Help Me?

As with all deeply rooted behavioural disorders, the sooner treatment for co-dependency is begun the more treatable it is. Minnesota House co-dependency treatment occurs at our residential facility in Surrey. Our treatment program offers the chance to overcome co-dependency issues. Utilising evidence based and highly individualised programmes, Minnesota House teaches co-dependent people to love and trust themselves while building up their self-respect. The program stresses a balance between individual needs and the needs of loved ones whilst providing a healthier way to manage anxiety. Patients will come away with the tools to create meaningful, two-way relationships. This can only be achieved in residential facilities such as Minnesota House, simply because it provides a safe, healthy, productive, and supportive environment in which to grow away from the destructive triggers that surround day to day life.

 

How Can I Start Co-Dependency Treatment At Minnesota House?

Starting treatment for co-dependency is an easy process, but often the hardest step to take. At Minnesota House our highly qualified and experienced Admission professionals will take applicants through the whole admission process. Once a person has spoken to us and feels comfortable, we will provide a pre-screening assessment to ensure that we are truly the right place for the individual to enter co-dependency This treatment will give people suffering from co-dependency the best chance of reaching and maintaining a healthy long term recovery.

Treatment of codependency

Patients may receive treatment as an in-patient or as an out-patient. Since co-dependency is usually rooted in childhood, treatment often involves exploration into early childhood issues and their relationship to current destructive behavioural patterns. Treatment allows co-dependents to rediscover themselves and to identify self-defeating behavioural patterns. Treatment also focuses on getting in touch with feelings that have been buried since childhood and on reconstructing family dynamics. The goal is to enable our patient to experience a full range of feelings again.

When codependency hits home

The first step in changing unhealthy behaviour is to understand it. It is important for co-dependents, and when possible their family members, to educate themselves about the course and cycle of codependency and how it extends into their relationships.

Much change and growth is necessary for the co-dependent and their family. Any behaviour which allows or enables abuse to continue in their relationships needs to be recognised and stopped. The co-dependent must identify and embrace their feelings and needs. This may include learning to say no, to be loving yet tough, and to be self-reliant. Co-dependents can find freedom, love and serenity in recovery.

Our holistic approach includes the following:

1. Our ultimate priority is to identify and treat the underlying causes of the codependency– physical, psychological, genetic, biochemical and social.
2. Our treatment of the underlying causes of the codependency
3. Medication is prescribed only as a last resort. Our goal is for patients to be drug free and, just as importantly, free of their side-effects.
4. We will, when possible, invite the patient’s most important family members to attend a Family Systems Therapy program during the patient’s treatment. This is not mandatory, but we strongly encourage it. The participating family members will gain an understanding of their loved one’s disorder and how they are involved in it. Such therapy can result in family members themselves deciding to seek treatment to address their own dysfunctional behaviour and pain.
5. Continuing care is crucial to long-term recovery. It is relatively easy for a patient to be abstinent in the clinical environment, whereas the real challenge is for them to remain abstinent and to continue their recovery after returning home. To address this, we have a Continuing Care Program which can include a mentor or psychotherapist returning home with the patient to support their re-engagement with their home, family, work, school and friends. Just as importantly, the psychotherapist helps the patient to adapt their lifestyle to their recovery program. Other elements of the program can include daily telephone/Skype calls for the first critical period of time and return visits to the, at first on a monthly basis, then quarterly for the first year and then at a declining frequency until the end of year two. Continuing care can last from anywhere between a few days to 2 years and, combined with 12-Step support groups, it greatly increases the likelihood of a long-term recovery.

Individualised treatment

Minnesota House provides an individualised treatment approach to meet the precise needs of each patient. We only treat patients individually, not in groups, so our entire clinical team (comprising doctors, psychiatrists, psychotherapists, counsellors and nutritionists) and our complementary therapy team, work with just one patient and their family. We look beneath the symptoms as a way to understand the function of addictive behaviour in the patient’s life. Once we identify the underlying causes of our patient’s disorder, we treat them using research-based interventions.

A unique and effective approach

We work with patients to help them regain control over their symptoms, to resolve trauma and to enable them to develop the skills necessary to let go of addictive thinking and behaviour in their day-to-day lives. We use pharmaceuticals only as a last resort. Treatment may include some or all of the following:

  1. Psychotherapy to discover and treat the underlying psychological issues that led to the onset of the disorder and any other psychiatric, personality, social or family issues identified in the treatment plan. Psychotherapy can involve:
    • Cognitive therapies
    • Mindfulness work
    • Positive psychology
    • Family systems therapy
  2. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) – the use of magnetic fields to stimulate nerve cells in the brain to treat depression.
  3. My Brain SolutionsTM – scientifically-designed computer exercises that target attention, memory, flexibility, stress-reduction and positivity.
  4. Balancing Life Education and Training – to help patients to define their life-goals
  5. Complem
    entary therapies
  6. Nutrition and lifestyle coaching
  7. An intensive Educational program, including a handbook containing relevant topics for each patient and family member involved in the treatment program.
  8. Completing some or all of the 12-Steps of Coda
  9. Attending Coda and other pertinent support group meetings.
  10. Spiritual counselling.
  11. A Family Systems Therapy program.
  12. Providing an intensive Continuing Care Program for the patient and family members, which often involves a mentor returning home with the patient to help them adjust to their new life.
Drug Addiction Self-Assessment Test

Whether you are addicted to prescription drugs or street drugs, your life is on a downhill spiral and you are hurting those who love you. If you are serious about discovering and resolving your problem, this self-assessment test may be helpful.
The following questions are designed to be used merely as guidelines for identifying possible signs of drug addiction. They are not intended to provide a sure-fire method of diagnosis, nor can negative answers to these questions provide absolute assurance that no addiction is present. Many drug addicts have varying patterns, which can result in very different ways of approaching and answering these questions.

 

Answer yes or no to each question.

  1. Do you use any illegal drugs, including marijuana and/or non-prescribed doses of prescription drugs?
  2. Do you regularly exceed the dosage recommendations of over-the-counter medicines such as painkillers, cold medicines, laxatives, diet aids or sleep aids?
  3. Have you ever gone to a different doctor to get larger quantities of a medicine than your doctor has prescribed?
  4. Do you purchase drugs or medicines from or through unlicensed strangers?
  5. Are some of your closest friends recreational drug abusers?
  6. Have you failed to keep a promise to yourself or a loved one that you would stop taking drugs?
  7. Imagine that you no longer have any of your favourite drug and that you also need to pay for a service you purchased, but you only have enough money for one of these. Would you buy the drug?
  8. Do you hide your drug use from friends, family, your employer or the government?
  9. Do you combine drugs with drinking for more of a “buzz”?
  10. In the last year, have you done anything while using drugs that you regret?
  11. Do you hide your drugs while carrying them in the car or on your person?
  12. Have you missed work in the last year because of a drugs hangover or withdrawal?

 

Scoring the drug addiction self-assessment test

  1. If you answered “Yes” to any of the above questions, you may have a problem.
  2. If you answered “Yes” to 3 or more of the above questions, you probably have a problem. This condition is treatable and you should contact us, your doctor or another qualified professional for a full assessment and a complete medical examination and/or go to an NA meeting.
  3. If you answered “Yes” to 7 or more of the above questions, you have a problem. This condition is treatable and you should contact us, your doctor or another qualified professional for a full assessment and a complete medical examination and/or go to an NA meeting.
Alcoholism Self-Assessment Test

The following questions are designed to be used merely as guidelines for identifying possible signs of alcoholism. They are not intended to provide a sure-fire method of diagnosis, nor can negative answers to these questions provide absolute assurance that a problem does not exist. Many alcoholics have varying patterns, which can result in very different ways of approaching and answering these questions.

 

Answer yes or no to each question.

  1. In the last month, have you drunk alcohol in the morning to help recover from a hangover (“hair of the dog that bit you”)?
  2. In the last year, have you driven while under the influence of alcohol, even just a couple of drinks?
  3. In the last 3 months, have you continued drinking until you became unconscious?
  4. Are more than 50% of your friends drinkers?
  5. Do you consume more than 7 alcoholic beverages a week?
  6. In the last 3 months, have you taken alcohol to work to drink during your workday or have you chosen a lunch venue because it serves alcohol?
  7. Do you hide your drinking from any friends or family?
  8. Have you failed to keep a promise to yourself or a loved one that you would quit drinking?
  9. Have you ever encountered difficulties remembering what happened while you were drinking?
  10. In the last year, have you done anything while drinking that you regret?
  11. Do you find it difficult to stop after one or two drinks?
  12. In the last year, have you urinated or soiled the bed or your clothes during or after drinking?
  13. Have you ever woken up after drinking in a strange place or at home, without remembering how you got there?

 

Scoring the alcoholism self-assessment test

  1. If you answered “Yes” to any of the above questions you may have a problem or the start of a problem.
  2. If you answered “Yes” to 3 or more of the above questions, you may be an alcoholic. This is treatable and you should contact us, your doctor or another qualified professional for a full assessment and a complete medical examination and/or attend a meeting of AA. If you are unwilling or unable to do these things, you are most likely an alcoholic.
  3. If you answered “Yes” to 5 or more of the above questions, you are probably an alcoholic and may already have organ damage from your alcohol addiction. Furthermore, this is probably causing relationship issues within your family. This is treatable and you should contact us, your doctor or another qualified professional for a full assessment and a complete medical examination.