+27 (0) 44 870 8585 info@MinnesotaHouse.org

Wellness Training Workshops

Sustainable Sobriety and Long-Term Recovery

The Recovery Wellness Training Program

is a recovery training and out-patient solution for working professionals and individuals interested in working within the addiction rehab field, substance abuse in the workplace or for individuals who simply want to improve their own recovery or who want to develop themselves and become self-developed and in turn more self-empowered.

The Recovery Wellness Training Program

is a form of strengths-based support for persons with addictions or in recovery from alcohol, other drugs, co-dependency and other addictive behaviours.

The Recovery Wellness Training Program

is on the second Saturday of every month.

Wellness Training Workshops

Sustainable Sobriety and Long-Term Recovery

The Recovery Wellness Training Program is a recovery training and out-patient solution for working professionals and individuals interested in working within the addiction rehab field, substance abuse in the workplace or for individuals who simply want to improve their own recovery or who want to develop themselves and become self-developed and in turn more self-empowered. –George, Garden Route – Attend on the second Saturday of every month

For anyone in the Recovery field, the training we offer is an innovative new approach to healing people’s lives that is unlike any other training. Utilising a dynamic approach to learning that blends both process and content, our training offers a once-in-a-lifetime experience that can be seen as pure Recovery innovation. If you’re ready to learn, be challenged, and reap valuable rewards for life, our monthly training is a must!

Minnesota House Recovery Centre is a treatment centre that specialises in addiction treatment and recovery. With the growing demand for programs that focus on sustainable sobriety and long-term recovery Minnesota House has identified the need for a program that differs slightly from traditional outpatient programs. The focus of the Minnesota House Recovery Training Wellness Program is self-development and self-empowerment through forward-focused, solutions-based training within a group environment.

The Minnesota House Recovery Wellness Training Program creates a safe environment for recovering addicts to move forward in their recovery by focusing on rebuilding the physical, mental, emotional, social and spiritual spheres of life.

The program runs every second Saturday of the month, to provide to the needs of people who are not able to commit to a full-time residential recovery program. The training program also takes into account that certain individuals are looking for a program that can help them address their substance misuse, abuse and dependence issues and the challenges it presents, while undertaking a harm reduction program and moving towards abstinence.

Individuals are given the opportunity to explore their choices in these areas and so develop their own long-term recovery plans. The program is unique and is tailored around the changing needs of the group. Support and solutions are offered in a non-judgmental setting, where the individual is given the freedom to determine a recovery path that resonates with their personal beliefs and values.

The groups are facilitated by social workers and other professionals with vast addiction recovery experience, whom are experienced in the specialty of substance misuse, whose role is to assist and aid the processes that take place throughout the training conversation. Unlike counselling and therapy, training aims to guide the journey which is determined by the individual in recovery or by a person who strives towards self-empowerment through self-development. Individuals are encouraged and supported to determine their own unique path of recovery, and by so doing learn to take responsibility and be fully accountable for their progress. Advice is kept to a minimum and confidentiality is maintained unless absolutely necessary to support the individual’s recovery. Topics that are covered during the training process include, but are not limited to:

10 Oct 2015 | Addictive Relationships
Presented by Annesta Hofer

There’s a lot of skepticism in the media, amongst academics and researchers about whether an individual can really be ‘addicted’ to another person. But if you remember one of the classic definitions of addiction, which is to pursue a behaviour compulsively in spite of negative consequences, then relationship addiction fits the description.

Relationship addiction can be one of the hardest behaviours to break, because the person experiencing it – and others – may not recognise it as a destructive, compulsive behaviour. But like any addictive behaviour, it can come to feel like the sufferers life depends on being able to hold on to the relationship as an external source of self-validation. And like any other addiction, the sufferer may know the situation is wrong but can’t just change their mind and walk away. Rational thinking is in short supply, and the addicted person needs a recovery program.

14 Nov 2015 | Healthy Relationships in Recovery
Presented by Annesta Hofer

An essential part of the recovery process is to have a support system. Developing healthy relationships can lead to be faster recovery and lifelong relationships.

When a person is going through the recovery process, maintaining healthy relationships is very important. Healthy should consist of positive and healthy support from all of the people involved. It is typical for a person who goes through a recovery program for addiction, to usually come out with a whole new set of friends. These new friends can be the most positive people they have ever had relationships with in their life. Typically, these relationships will last for a long period of time due to the connection they had during the weakest part of their lives.

Avoiding former negative influences and people, could help prevent the addiction from recurring again. When the person is able to develop a positive group of friends and a support group recovery can be an easier process. Creating healthy can be a lifetime support and something that can grow.

12 Dec 2015 | Co-Dependency Explained
Presented by Marcel Plodzien & Annesta Hofer

Sandra C. Anderson, Ph.D., Emerita Professor at Portland State University, describes “co-dependency” as a pattern of painful dependence on compulsive behaviours and on approval from others in an attempt to find safety, self-worth, and identity.

Shawn Meghan Burn, Ph.D., professor of psychology at the California Polytechnic State University, says “Co-dependent relationships are a specific type of dysfunctional helping relationship.” Burn defines a co-dependent relationship as a dysfunctional helping relationship where one person supports or enables the other person’s addiction, poor mental health, immaturity, irresponsibility, or under-achievement.

People with a predisposition to be a co-dependent enabler often find themselves in relationships where their primary role is that of rescuer, supporter, and confidante. These helper types are often dependent on the other person’s poor functioning to satisfy their own emotional needs.

09 Jan 2016 | Understanding Addiction: The disease of addiction
Presented by Annesta Hofer & Roger Hewitt

 

How Addiction Hijacks the Brain:

  1. Addiction involves craving for something intensely, loss of control over its use, and continuing involvement with it despite adverse consequences.
  2. Addiction changes the brain, first by subverting the way it registers pleasure and then by corrupting other normal drives such as learning and motivation.
  3. Although breaking an addiction is tough, it can be done.

What causes addiction?

The word “addiction” is derived from a Latin term for “enslaved by” or “bound to.” Anyone who has struggled to overcome an addiction—or has tried to help someone else to do so—understands why.

Addiction exerts a long and powerful influence on the brain that manifests in three distinct ways: craving for the object of addiction, loss of control over its use, and continuing involvement with it despite adverse consequences.

For many years, experts believed that only alcohol and powerful drugs could cause addiction. Neuroimaging technologies and more recent research, however, have shown that certain pleasurable activities, such as gambling, shopping, and sex, can also co-opt the brain.

13 Feb 2016 | Anger Management
Presented by Annesta Hofer & Hennie Pienaar

We all know what anger is, and we’ve all felt it: whether as a fleeting annoyance or as full-fledged rage. Anger is a completely normal, usually healthy, human emotion. But when it gets out of control and turns destructive, it can lead to problems—problems at work, in your personal relationships, and in the overall quality of your life and it can make you feel as though you’re at the mercy of an unpredictable and powerful emotion. This workshop will attempt to help you understand and control anger. The goal of anger management is to reduce both your emotional feelings and the physiological arousal that anger causes. You can’t get rid of, or avoid, the things or the people that enrage you, nor can you change them, but you can learn to control your reactions.

There are psychological tests that measure the intensity of angry feelings, how prone to anger you are, and how well you handle it. But chances are good that if you do have a problem with anger, you already know it. If you find yourself acting in ways that seem out of control and frightening, you might need help finding better ways to deal with this emotion.

12 Mar 2016 | Goal setting for a new life with direction (short & long term)
Presented by Annesta Hofer & Lyndie Haarhoff

Learn how to set SMART goals.: Many people feel as if they’re adrift in the world. They work hard, but they don’t seem to get anywhere worthwhile.

A key reason that they feel this way is that they haven’t spent enough time thinking about what they want from life, and haven’t set themselves formal goals. After all, would you set out on a major journey with no real idea of your destination? Probably not!

Goal setting is a powerful process for thinking about your ideal future, and for motivating yourself to turn your vision of this future into reality. The process of setting goals helps you choose where you want to go in life. By knowing precisely what you want to achieve, you know where you have to concentrate your efforts. You’ll also quickly spot the distractions that can, so easily, lead you astray.

09 Apr 2016 | Anger and Communication
Presented by Annesta Hofer & Hennie Pienaar

The way we communicate or the style we use to communicate is often learned from much earlier experiences in our lives when our language skills were newly formed. Most of us tend to communicate in a way that was adaptive in the environment we grew up, but problematic in our lives today. For many of us, our style of communication can leave us with unmet needs, unexpressed emotion, and damaging effects on those around us.

14 May 2016 | Vital Absorbing Creative Interests (VACI)
Presented by Annesta Hofer & Johan Rabie Murray

A Vital Absorbing Creative Interest (VACI) can help bring back the simple pleasure of living a life free of substances and unhelpful behaviours. When we get overly involved in any one activity, be it helpful or not so helpful, we cut a lot out of our lives that we used to enjoy. Finding a balance can restore the fun and enjoyment that life has to offer. So how can we get back to those simple pleasures of life?

First take a look at the benefits list on your Cost-Benefit Analysis. What were some of the benefits you were getting from your unhelpful behaviour or drug of choice before the costs became too high? Did you enjoy the buzz? Did you like being able to just check out for a bit? Did you like the taste? Maybe it was the social aspect? Each of these benefits is a key to finding a VACI.

If you enjoyed the buzz, then look at things you could do to get a real buzz out of life. You might have to work harder at it, but the reward will be greater, AND you will actually remember it in the morning and for years to come. Maybe you decide to ride a roller coaster you have never ridden before. Maybe it is learning to run. Perhaps you have always wanted to sky dive. Maybe you have always wanted to learn to ride a motorcycle. Figure out what would give you a buzz and take it on.

11 Jun 2016 | Determining and applying personal beliefs & values into daily life
Presented by Annesta Hofer & Lyndie Haarhoff

TBA

09 Jul 2016 | The Adult Child
Presented by Marcel Plodzien & Annesta Hofer

TBA

13 Aug 2016 | Nutrition in recovery
Presented by Annesta Hofer

TBA

10 Sep 2016 | Tools of Recovery
Presented by Annesta Hofer

TBA

8 Oct 2016 | Healthy Communication and Conflict resolution
Presented by Annesta Hofer

TBA

12 Nov 2016 | ‘Seeing as though we are all just human’
Presented by Annesta Hofer

TBA

10 Dec 2016 | Triggers, Urges , Cravings and Avoiding relapse & Self-Efficacy
Presented by Annesta Hofer

TBA

14 Jan 2017 | Critical thinking skills
Presented by Annesta Hofer

TBA

11 Feb 2017 | Fear & Anxiety & Relaxation Techniques for Stress Relief
Presented by Annesta Hofer

TBA

11 Mar 2017 | Developing a Personal Recovery (and Relapse Prevention) Plan
Presented by Annesta Hofer

TBA

08 Apr 2017 | Shame, Guilt and Lying
Presented by Annesta Hofer

TBA

13 May 2017 | Family dynamics in addiction
Presented by Annesta Hofer

TBA

10 Jun 2017 | Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drugs
Presented by Annesta Hofer

TBA

08 Jul 2017 | Balance Wheel of Life
Presented by Annesta Hofer

TBA

12 Aug 2017 | Rebuilding a deep and wide internal and external tool set of recovery resources
Presented by Annesta Hofer

TBA

09 Sep 2017 | Understanding personal & professional relationships in recovery
Presented by Annesta Hofer

TBA

14 Oct 2017 | Exploring Healthy Lifestyle Choices
Presented by Annesta Hofer

TBA

11 Nov 2017 | Emotions Unlocked and Explained
Presented by Marcel Plodzien & Annesta Hofer

TBA

There is an educational element to the Minnesota House Recovery Wellness Training Program that aids individuals in better understanding their addiction and recovery, as well as their journey towards self-development. This also gives an opportunity to learn new tools and skills that will empower people in recovery. By being responsible for their personal development, individuals are better equipped to manage their recovery in a holistic and honest way.

For more information on the Minnesota House Recovery Training Wellness Program please contact us on +27 (0) 44 870 8585 to discuss your options.

RECOVERY TRAINING WELLNESS is a form of strengths-based support for persons with addictions or in recovery from alcohol, other drugs, co-dependency and other addictive behaviours.

For anyone interested in working within the addiction rehab field, substance abuse in the workplace or for individuals who simply want to improve their own recovery or who want to develop themselves and become self-empowered